Azimuth Drive Success

It was like putting a puzzle together, but the L-bracket supporting a second flange bearing is incorporated into the azimuth drive and we have a complete unit.   After Larry did some creative work with the cutoff saw on the L-bracket, it just fit next to the hinge plate.

OK, let’s say we decide ten years from now that we want to replace the drive wheel.  First step will be to remove the drive unit – there’s no way the drive wheel will come out without getting this unit on the bench.

Once you have it where you can work on it, you would loosen the shaft coupler (2.5mm allen), remove the gear box (four bolts), remove the L-bracket mounting bolts (2), loosen the bearing set screws on both bearings (1/8 allen, 4 of ’em), and, finally, slip the shaft with drive wheel and L-bracket bearing out of the mounting.  With the drive shaft, wheel and L-bracket free, remove the L-bracket from the drive shaft and, using your crescent wrenches, loosen the Trantorques on either side of the drive wheel so that they and the wheel can slide off of the shaft as well. Of course, being a careful worker, you will have measured the distance from the hub to the end of the shaft so that when you put it back together, it will fit (you only have to hit it within a quarter-inch). Got the new wheel? Transfer the bushings to the new wheel, and do all of the steps in reverse to get it re-assembled.

We didn’t give any official adjustment to the bearing locations – a design mistake on my part – but my fabrication skills gave us enough play to wobble everything into line. Once the shaft is locked down to the two supporting flange bearings, you can settle the shaft coupler attached to the gear box shaft onto the drive shaft and secure it to its mounting. Wobbling skills will be important to your success.

Next in line (after getting the roll off roof automation settled, that is), the altitude drive assembly. The parts are coming, the parts are coming!

Advertisements

No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: